Perspectives - The Blog

Tagged: Black & White

COLETTE VEASEY-CULLORS

Posted by The Center on September 24, 2010


(Photo credit: Colette Veasey-Cullors, Girls #2 from the series Children)

Genetics are a curious thing. Whether you side with nature or nurture, who you ultimately become is heavily reliant on the blue print you were born with. Colette Veasey-Cullors marvels at the free standing development of her own girls in the series Children.

She writes:

Here are my feelings about the Children series. Since the birth of my three daughters, I have begun to question the idea of femininity. As I watched these three girls I began to discover that “femaleness” was not something that I was consciously teaching them. Each of my children, in their own way, has their own innate way of being. I am intrigued by the way each of my children physically, emotionally, and intellectually expresses themselves. I began to study and photograph their body language and facial expressions; while also, writing down conversations and questions that they were having with me. In this series, I am seeking to explore the vulnerability, femininity, and innocence of my daughters through “life lessons” passed from mother to daughter.

See more of Colette’s work at www.coletteveasey-cullors.com

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CHARLES ROZIER

Posted by The Center on September 23, 2010


(Photo credit: Charles Rozier, Cindy)

Charles Rozier has sequenced the last 35 years of his life in photographs. What distinguishes his brand of situational portraiture are the meticulous edits of a revolving cast of family and familiars. It’s easy to imagine Rozier’s project as vignettes from a film, the moments spontaneous but lovingly interpreted.

He writes:

Cindy’s wedding is part of a 35-year sequence of un-posed situational portraits of people around me, mostly of my family. This project has driven almost all my photography ever since, and it remains a work in progress. Though I can’t say just how it began, I do know that an early exposure in my teens to Cartier-Bresson and Arbus was life-changing.
The three series are roughly chronological and are grouped by their media. Although I feel all the photographs emerge from the same point of view. Each series does have a somewhat different character. The earlier monochrome images, like this one, are generally more documentary in style; the later series tend to be more static and formal.

Visit www.charlesrozierphotographs.com to see more of Rozier’s work.

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