In the Beginning: of Species

April 6 - 28, 2018

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Index
Biosphere with California Condor (Both Printed on Silk)
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
California Condor, calls (Printed on silk)
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
Night Pond
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
The Difference of a Day
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
Maroon NIght
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
The Luxury of Night (2AM)
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
Tidal Haiku
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
Jill's Chanterelle
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
Whooping Crane, calls (Printed on Silk)
Alice Hargrave
Artist's Website
Index
Untitled
Goseong Choi
Artist's Website
Index
Lost
Deborah Bernagozzi
Artist's Website

In The Beginning: of Species

Please join us at The Green Room for this exciting collaboration!

Open from 1:00-5:30 Thursday-Saturday at 344 East Mountain Avenue, Fort Collins, CO

 

The Center for Fine Art Photography presents an exhibition in partnership with Crisis and Creativity, a Global Challenges Research Team funded by the School for Global Environment Sustainability at Colorado State University. This exhibition will feature the work of the Crisis and Creativity Working Group and Alice Hargrave with additional work form Debora Bernagozzi and Goseong Choi.

 

 

A reception with poetry readings and artist talks will be on Thursday, April 19th from 5:30 – 8:30 pm.

 

 

Crisis and Creativity, a Global Challenges Research Team funded by the School for Global Environment Sustainability at Colorado State University, created this “science meets art” exhibit, with an aim to help the public better understand the increasing threat that species loss poses to environmental sustainability around the world.

The Crisis and Creativity Global Challenge Research Team includes: Felicia Zamora, poet laureate of Fort Collins, Cedar Brant, University of New Mexico, Department of English.Assistant Professor Ed Hall, Department of Ecosystems Science and Sustainability; Associate Professor Dan Beachy-Quick, Department of English; ; Professor Maria Fernandez-Gimenez, Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship; Stewart Breck, research wildlife biologist with the United States Department of Agriculture-Wildlife Services-National Wildlife Research Center; Christopher Schell, postdoctoral scientist in the Department of Biology.

 

The research team have created text-based works of art using an extinction algorithm that they developed.

 

The text applies the loss of species to iconic prose to illustrate and emphasize the ongoing crisis of species extinction. Photo-based work, including a 22 foot long and 10 feet high printed silk  from Hargrave’s Paradise Wavering will corroborate the text-based pieces. In addition there will be a sound piece featuring the call of birds on the extinction list. Also featured is a video titled, Lost, by Debora Bernagozzi and a five foot long untitled image by Goseong Choi.

 

Alice Hargrave Artist Statement, 2018

Alice Hargrave’s photographic and video works reflect on the notion of impermanence—of the natural environment, our personal experiences, the larger human condition, and photographic processes themselves. She is interested in how the fugitive color shifts of the photographic medium over time actually color our memory. Photographic mural-wallpapers, silk banners, videos, video projections, and sound installation are medias she has used to reimagine diverse ecosystems through the filters of time, emotion, memory, and environmental concerns.

 

The Paradise Wavering photographs lead through tropical biospheres, mangroves, seascapes, riverscapes, ponds, prairies, and forests, placing the viewer into an intimate yet immersive experience of the organic world. The work is contemplative and constructed; searching for beauty,wonder, and the sublime in ever changing habitats while also alluding to an inevitable future of environmental insecurity, habitat loss, and species extinctions.

 

In Hargrave’s recent ongoing project Pink Noise / Last Calls; she has created photographic “portraits” of several endangered and threatened bird species from North America, as well as other countries. Using spectrograph depictions of the sound waves of actual bird calls, the marks are photographed, layered, and toned with hues found within the spectrum of each bird species. Reminiscent of hieroglyphics, this language of sound traces last calls in the wild, and in some cases are the only surviving calls of certain species. The palette comes from extracting the unexpected colors that one might not initially see upon looking at a particular bird. The amazing colors of eyes, talons, and skin, contradicts the ubiquitous argument “why save that simple brown bird”.

 

The Paradise Wavering landscapes are the empty grounds of a figure ground relationship between the threatened birds and the lands they used to occupy in abundance.

Photography is the art of the fleeting, an attempt to catch hold of all things ephemeral —light, love, nature, time, happiness— however futile this attempt may be, we still try to grab hold of time, but time and memory are fickle.

This quote from George Sand embodies my artistic practice. “The consciousness of self as animal, vegetable, and mineral and the delight we feel plunging down into that consciousness is by no means degrading– It is good to know the fundamental life at our roots.”