Peter Brown Leighton, Man Lives Through Plutonium Blast | Solo Exhibition

August 4 - September 23, 2017

1 2 3
Index
There Must Be Some Way Out of Here
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Good News
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
The Best Medicine
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Impure Thoughts
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
The Pleasure of Your Company
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
A Lifelong Job
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Hot Tramp
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Brave New World
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
It Felt Like A Kiss
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
La Petite Morte
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Thinking of You
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
In My Mind
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Ruby Finds a Corpse
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
The Big Picture
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
When Prayer Fails
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
A Magical Thought
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Where the Answers Are
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
The People Who LIve Next Door
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
The Fire Next Time
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
History Repeating
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
V for Vicotry
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
Souvenir
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
An Attack is Taking Place
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
The Messenger
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website
Index
After Total War Comes Total Living
Peter Brown Leighton
Artist's Website

 

Artist Statement

Writing in 1961, a year before the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Colombian writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez suggested in an essay that “life is the best thing ever invented”. If we are to take him at his word, the question left begging is this: Why is it that humanity seems so often inclined to push itself to the very brink of extinction in ever more creative and lethal ways?

 

The imaginary vernacular photographs in Man Lives Through Plutonium Blast, constructed from bits and pieces of discarded twentieth-century, analog snapshots, depict open-ended, existential points of departure that speak to the absurdity of this paradox.

 

As constructed photographs, the series also challenges the viewer to consider what the role of photography today should be in a world in which distinctions between fact and fiction, truth and perception, have on a daily basis become matters of considerable import and debate.

 

-Peter Brown Leighton